A chronology of events

Now that I’m completely finished with the report, I can relax a little and share the findings here on the blog.  There are a lot of parts and pieces to the research, so I’ll be adding them as posts over the coming weeks.  I also hope to create a version of the full presentation to post in a few weeks, so keep an eye out for that!

Today I’ll share with you Appendix B – which is just a basic chronology of events for each house.  You can take a look at the full appendix below, but here’s a snapshot of 811 South Cathedral Place’s major events over the years:

Pickrell-Alsop House, 811 South Cathedral Place

1889, Jul 29 John C. Shafer took out $4,500 Mutual Assurance Coverage on unit under policy #24225; Construction was in process, property owned by John C. Shafer

1889 – 1900+ Pickrell family resided

1890, Dec 16 Joint deed with 813 Floyd Avenue made as bond towards repaying of a $10,000 debt; Legh R. Page and George Christian appointed trustees

1895, Mar 24 John C. Shafer, property owner, died

1903, Apr 9 James A. Moncure, administrator of the Shafer estate transferred property by deed to Boswell Alsop for $8,500

1903, Jun 4 Cornerstone laid for foundation of the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart Continue reading “A chronology of events”

A Visit to 819 S. Cathedral Place

100_1473On Tuesday of this week, I was very fortunate to meet with Mr. Walter Harrow from the Virginia Baptist Mission Board who was so incredibly kind to give me a tour of 819 South Cathedral Place, the westernmost unit of our row.  This is also the unit that appears to be the first sale and deed transfer from developer John C. Shafer to George Stevens in 1892.

It is understandable why this home was so desirable.  George Stevens was already residing on the row two houses down at 815 Floyd Avenue and evidently liked the location.  He was married and probably living with a few small children as well as an in-law, according to the Richmond Directories of that time.  819 was built with a slightly wider footprint, and of course being on the end offered more windows for added light and circulation, which couldn’t hurt the full household.  And, Stevens was headed up the ladder towards distinguished success at Chesapeake & Ohio Rail.  He was in the position to make the purchase of a comfortable residence for his family. Continue reading “A Visit to 819 S. Cathedral Place”

Findings on George W. Stevens, resident of 819

Some small developments and findings on George W. Stevens, so far first owner-occupier of one of the row houses.  His obituary printed in the New York Times notes his sudden death while dictating a letter at the age of 69.  He had four children, the first his only girl, Helen Stevens who married Episcopal minister Rev. John J. Gravatt.  So, we now know that most likely the property was transferred to Helen by will, then sold (transferred by deed) by the Gravatts to the Holzgrefe sisters in 1942.

Click through to see the obituary. Continue reading “Findings on George W. Stevens, resident of 819”